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20 July 2017

Smoking and braaiing in Sectional Title schemes
South Africa - IHFM
Living in close proximity to neighbours, which is what sectional title living often is, can sometimes bring situations to the fore that might seem trivial to some, but might affect some more seriously than others think.

An example of those contentious issues where there are two very opposing factions are smokers vs non-smokers and those who like to braai and those who don't.

These activities can affect the neighbours negatively, and those taking part in the activity don't realise just how negative the impact can be, says Michael Bauer, general manager of property management company IHFM.
Smoking and braaiing

How and why you should be helping your children get onto the property ladder
South Africa - Rawson
As parents, we all want the best for our children, and that means helping them make responsible life choices and plan for a secure future. One of the easiest ways to do this is to encourage sound, long term investments like property, but getting a foot onto that ladder can be daunting when you’re just starting out in the adult world.

“It definitely pays to become a property owner as early on in life as possible,” says Bill Rawson, Chairman of the Rawson Property Group, “but trying to get a bond on a starter salary – even in a high-paying career – can be difficult to do. A sectional title unit in a good area with good growth prospects can easily cost R1 million and more – that’s nearly R10 000 a month in bond payments, assuming you can secure a 100% loan, which is extremely rare these days.”

To qualify for a bond of that size, your child would need to be earning around R35 000 per month. Needless to say, not many recent graduates have that many zeros on their payslip, but that doesn’t mean property is out of their reach – at least, not with a little help from you.
Rawson  

Am I too young to buy my first house?
South Africa - Harcourts
The short answer is no. If you have the financial means and qualify then investing in property in your early 20's & 30's might be one of the best decisions of your young adult life.

Strangely enough, the majority of first-time home buyers are in their 40 & 50's, when they are already overloaded with a myriad of financial responsibilities, families, businesses, or other investments, which means they will either have to work longer to pay off their mortgages or enter retirement with a substantial amount of debt hanging over their heads.

Buying property in your 20's when you have very few to no financial commitments, means that you are ahead of the pack, and will have a solid investment by the time you are ready to start a family.
Am I too young?

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